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NAME CHANGE CONSIDERATIONS FOR WASHINGTON DIVORCE

There are many things for a person seeking a divorce to consider as they go through the process. The division of property, child custody and spousal maintenance are just a few of the issues that can be negotiated in a divorce by separating spouses. In addition, a soon-to-be ex-spouse must consider their financial future as they move forward after the dissolution.

One of the considerations for a person getting a divorce is a name change. For some in Washington this is a serious decision. A name that a person has used for many years or that matches that of children may be difficult for a divorcing person to give up. Even when one desires to go back to their maiden name, there may be challenges.

As a part of a divorce petition in Washington, a person can request to have their name changed back to their pre-marital name. This change is a common request in the divorce petition and can be granted by the court at the time of the final decree. Once granted, the person seeking the change may begin to use their maiden name.

After a divorce, a newly single person can also apply to the Social Security Administration to have their name permanently changed back from their marital name. The application process is a simple one and requires only proof of the reason for the change and an official copy of the final divorce decree. After the application is processed, a new card will be mailed to the home of the applicant. This usually takes about 10 business days.

Making a name change after a divorce is an individual decision. However, when a person decides to change their name, it is important that they ensure that both the Social Security Administration and the IRS have the same, updated information. By verifying this information, the newly divorced person may be able to avoid potential tax problems that could result from using different names.

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