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FAMILY LAW: IS ALIMONY RIGHT FOR DIVORCED WASHINGTON COUPLES?

During a divorce process, many Washington couples can face disagreements. Family law issues such as child custody, support and alimony are all areas in which couples can feel strongly about how the situation should be resolved. As divorce becomes more common and the duties of husband and wives become less divided, the way some issues are handled may seem outdated for the modern couple looking to separate.

Alimony is one of those points in which the necessity may not be as great as it once was. The concept was instituted during a time in which women were less likely to be generating their own income and would need continued support after a divorce. However, this dynamic has changed considerably as more women are finishing their education and holding down successful jobs of their own. In some situations, the ex-wife could even be the one to pay alimony to the ex-husband.

Many individuals may even find the idea of alimony unsavory as the situations under which it is paid can appear unfair. Some ex-spouses must pay money to the other even though the receiving spouse may be living with another partner. In a similar vein, some parties may agree to make a lump sum alimony payment only to have the receiving ex-spouse remarry soon after, rendering the already agreed upon payment possibly unnecessary but still applicable.

Family law situations can sometimes be frustrating for individuals who feel that they may be taken advantage of. In order to decrease the chance of feeling this way, parties may wish to gather information on Washington state laws dealing with alimony and other divorce procedures. Having knowledge of the processes and aspects of divorce could help better determine beneficial agreement strategies.

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